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Christian College Geelong Senior Library: Lovers of literature

Parvana’s Promise by Deborah Ellis

The stunning sequel to Parvana and Parvana’s Journey is now here!

Parvana, now fifteen, is found in a bombed-out school and held as a suspected terrorist by American troops in Afghanistan.


resized_9781743312988_224_297_FitSquareOn a military base in post- Taliban Afghanistan, American authorities have imprisoned a teenage girl. The girl doesn’t respond to questions in any language and remains silent, even when she is threatened, harassed and mistreated over several days

She could tell the woman was watching her through the small window in the door. The girl kept her back against the door and didn’t move.
‘We can keep you locked up here for a very long time,’ the woman finally said, speaking softly. ‘Talk to me. Is your name Parvana?’
The girl remained with her back against the door. Silent. She heard the woman’s boots walk away down the hall. She stood and waited, listening hard to see if the boots would come back.
When she was sure she was alone, the girl in the dusty blue chador finally spoke. ‘Yes,’ she whispered. ‘My name is Parvana.’

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February 11, 2013 Posted by | War | , | Leave a comment

The Ink Bridge by Neil Grant

A remarkable and gripping story about one refugee boy on a desperate journey from Afghanistan, and the Australian boy who befriends him.

Each step becomes a heartbeat and I feel the distance between Omed and me closing. I remember when I first met him – when he had showed me what bravery meant. How he had stood up for what he believed. In the end that had been his undoing.
Omed is a boy from Afghanistan. After making an enemy of the Taliban on the day the Buddhas of Bamiyan are destroyed, he undertakes a perilous journey to seek asylum in Australia. Hector is a grieving Australian boy who has given up on school and retreated into silence.
Their paths meet at a candle factory where they both find work. But secrets fester behind the monotonous routine of assembling wax and wicks – secrets with terrible consequences. And, ultimately, it is up to Hector to see how the story ends.
Omed’s and Hector’s beautifully told and compelling journeys will grip hold of your heart and not let go.

March 15, 2012 Posted by | Relationships | , , | Leave a comment

Partitions by Amit Majmudar

A stunning first novel, set during the violent 1947 partition of India, about uprooted children and their journeys to safety.

As India is rent into two nations, communal violence breaks out on both sides of the new border and streaming hordes of refugees flee from blood and chaos.

At an overrun train station, Shankar and Keshav, twin Hindu boys, lose sight of their mother and join the human mass to go in search of her. A young Sikh girl, Simran Kaur, has run away from her father, who would rather poison his daughter than see her defiled. And Ibrahim Masud, an elderly Muslim doctor driven from the town of his birth, limps toward the new Muslim state of Pakistan, rediscovering on the way his role as a healer. As the displaced face a variety of horrors, this unlikely quartet comes together, defying every rule of self-preservation to forge a future of hope.

A dramatic, luminous story of families and nations broken and formed, Partitions introduces an extraordinary novelist who writes with the force and lyricism of poetry. MacMillan

November 9, 2011 Posted by | Family/Relationships, Past, people and places | | Leave a comment

The Happiest Refugee by Anh Do

 

The laugh-out-loud, reach-for-your-hanky story of one of Australia’s best-loved comedians.

The Happiest Refugee is Anh Do’s debut in the book world and a bruisingly honest depiction of his life to date. The story starts with Do’s parents meeting and falling in love in war-torn Vietnam, and tracks a young Anh as he and his family journey from their homeland to a refugee camp in Malaysia and finally Australia. Do takes us through the pleasures and pitfalls of growing up in Australia as an outsider. One of the things that particularly stands out about his attitude to life is just how unconditionally grateful he is to have experienced everything—even the bad. This book is about war, escape, pirates, love, courage, racism, alcoholism, comedy, tragedy, and, above all, hope. The way Do approaches his story is witty, charming and heart-warming, and just when you think you’re about to die from laughter, he wrenches your heartstrings so hard that within an instant you’re on the brink of crying The Happiest Refugee tells the incredible, uplifting and inspiring life story of one of our favourite personalities. Tragedy, humour, heartache and unswerving determination – a big life with big dreams. Anh’s story will move and amuse all who read it.

Written by: Bookseller+Publisher magazine

April 29, 2011 Posted by | Biographies, Humor | | Leave a comment