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Christian College Geelong Senior Library: Lovers of literature

Max by Sarah Cohen- Scali

If you enjoyed reading The Book Thief and The Boy in the Stripped Pyjamas then this new historical book will sure to please!

 

Meet Max—it’s 1936, Bavaria, and he’s still a foetus inside his blonde, blue-eyed mother. Utterly indoctrinated in the Nazi ideology, he will address you, tell you his story until 1945—his destiny as an exceptional being, the prototype of the ‘Lebensborn’ (Fountains of Youth) program, designed to produce perfect specimens of the Aryan race to regenerate the Reich. When Max meets Lukas, a young Polish boy who resembles him but who rebels against the Nazi system, cracks starts to appear in Max’s convictions…

Max is compulsive reading. Against all your instincts to despise what Max tells you, about his childish cruelty, his attempts to eliminate any aspect of weakness in order to become a tough Hitler youth, you will find yourself somehow understanding him, becoming attached to this orphan who personifies the evil that people are capable of inflicting on children in times of war.

Max is a fascinating, confronting historical fable. A little-known aspect of the World War II is brought to life through two striking characters whose paths cross tragically. In the words of Sarah Cohen-Scali to her readers: ‘I hope that, as I did, you will be able to feel indulgent towards Max’s flaws, and that you will love him, defend him, and adopt this orphan of evil…’

Review Text Publishing, Retrieved 18th March 2016, https://www.textpublishing.com.au/books/max

March 18, 2016 Posted by | Historical Fiction, War | , | Leave a comment

A Mother’s Story by Rosie Batty and Bryce Corbett

A profoundly moving  and inspiring memoir from Australia’s domestic violence crusader and former Australian of the year, Rosie Batty.

 

 

Rosie Batty knows pain no woman should have to suffer. Her son was killed by his father in a violent incident in February 2014, a horrendous event that shocked not only the nation, but the world. Greg Anderson murdered his 11-year-old son Luke and was then shot by police at the Tyabb cricket oval. Rosie had suffered years of family violence, and had had intervention and custody orders in place in an effort to protect herself and her son. She believes the killing was Greg’s final act of control over her.

Since the events of last February, Rosie has become an outspoken crusader against domestic violence, winning hearts and mind all over Australia with her compassion, courage, grace and forgiveness. In the wake of the tragedy, Rosie’s advocacy work has forced an unprecedented national focus on family violence, with the Victorian Labor government establishing Australia’s first royal commission into family violence, and committing a further $30 million over four years to protect women and children at high risk of family violence. The then Victorian Police Commissioner Ken Lay called it ‘the Rosie Batty factor’. In January 2015, Rosie was named Australian of the Year, 2015.

‘This highly emotional book … She suffers but she is not a victim. Batty is comforting and terrifying. She is protector and avenger… She has moral authority and dignity … compelling.’ ABR

Review from Harper Collins

March 3, 2016 Posted by | Biographies | , | Leave a comment